Archive for December, 2008

Josef hoffmann

Posted in Architects on December 30, 2008 by stevied1


Josef Hoffmann

Posted in Architects on December 30, 2008 by stevied1

Hoffmann studied at the Higher State Crafts School in Brno beginning in 1887 and then worked with the local military planning authority in Würzburg. Thereafter he studied at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna with Karl Freiherr von Hasenauer and Otto Wagner, graduating with a Prix de Rome in 1895. In Wagner’s office, he met Joseph Maria Olbrich, and together they founded the Vienna Secession in 1897 along with artists Gustav Klimt, and Koloman Moser.[1] Beginning in 1899, he taught at the University of Applied Arts Vienna. With the Secession, Hoffmann developed strong connections with other artists. He designed installation spaces for Secession exhibitions and a house for Moser which was built from 1901-1903. However, he soon left the Secession in 1905 along with other stylist artists due to conflicts with realist naturalists over differences in artistic vision and disagreement over the premise of Gesamtkunstwerk.[2] With the banker Fritz Wärndorfer and the artist Koloman Moser he established the Wiener Werkstätte, which was to last until 1932. He designed many products for the Wiener Werkstätte of which designer chairs, a lamp, and sets of glasses have reached the collection of the Museum of Modern Art,[3] and a tea service has reached the Metropolitan Museum of Art.[4]
Sanatorium Purkersdorf

Hoffmann’s style eventually became more sober and abstract and it was limited increasingly to functional structures and domestic products. In 1906, Hoffmann built his first great work, the Sanatorium in Purkersdorf. Compared to the Moser House, with its rusticated vernacular roof, this was a great advancement towards abstraction and a move away from traditional Arts and Crafts and historicism. This project served as a major precedent and inspiration for the modern architecture that would develop in the first half of the 20th century, for instance the early work of Le Corbusier.[5] It had a clarity, simplicity, and logic that foretold of a Neue Sachlichkeit.[6]
Palais Stoclet

Through contacts with Adolphe Stoclet, who sat on the supervisory board of the Austro-Belgischen Eisenbahn-Gesellschaft, he was commissioned to build the Palais Stoclet in Brussels from 1905 to 1911 for this wealthy banker and railway financier. This masterpiece of Jugendstil, was an example of Gesamtkunstwerk, replete with murals in the dining room by Klimt and four copper figures on the tower by Franz Metzner. In 1907, Hoffmann was co-founder of the Deutscher Werkbund, and in 1912 of the Österreichischer Werkbund. After World War II, he took on official tasks, that of an Austrian general commissioner with the Venice Biennale and a membership in the art senate.

David lachapelle

Posted in Photographers on December 30, 2008 by stevied1



David LaChapelle

Posted in Photographers on December 30, 2008 by stevied1

David LaChapelle (born March 11, 1963 in Fairfield, Connecticut)
is a photographer and video/commercial/film director who works in the fields of fashion, advertising, and fine art photography, and is noted for his surreal, unique and often humorous style.

He lists Adina Paley as one of his prime influences and claims that it was her work that first inspired him

Elliot Erwitt

Posted in Photographers on December 30, 2008 by stevied1


Elliot Erwitt

Posted in Photographers on December 30, 2008 by stevied1

France, 1928

One of the finest image makers of his generation, Elliott Erwitt describes himself as a professional photographer by trade and an amateur photographer by vocation. A member of the prestigious Magnum agency since 1954, his camera has taken him all over the globe since the late 1940s and his pictures have been the subject of several books and exhibitions worldwide (including a one-man show at the Museum of Modern Art, New York).

He sprung to fame through the kitchen debate photograph, taken in 1959 of Krushchev and Nixon arguing in front of a Westinghouse refrigerator and he has since become one of the best loved observers of life. With unmistakable style and wit, his work captures the famous and the ordinary, the strange and the mundane, over more than half a century.

Andreas Gursky

Posted in Photographers on December 30, 2008 by stevied1